Saturday, 15 February 2020

Going Around The Bend

In my last post I raved on about a railway modelling "stream bed" product that I thought could be used in wargaming. 

I'd already blasted out a metre or so when one of my more astute readers asked me how I was going to create river bends given that the stuff came out of the packet in one long straight roll.

Err…

Balls!

Forgot about the corners.

After a bit of experimentation I ended up using the Terry's Chocolate Orange approach in which I took cheese wedge chunks out of a straight bit then glued them together on the backing board. As Eric used to say about little Ern's hairpiece… you can barely see the join. 

My curves are designed to transition from one flat edge of a hex to another so are relatively gentle, however I'm pretty sure with a bit more time and patience I could produce a longer fairly wriggly affair in the same manner.

You can just about see the faint grey hex lines - if you stare at the picture for 20 mins or so.

While on the subject of terrain, I'd resigned myself to making another load of road sections too when I came across this little beauty - also in the railway modelling section of ebay. 


6mm "gentleman with halberd" for scale comparison

Yeah, it's a roll of cork for putting under track. The more I looked at the texture the more I thought…dirt road. 


For ten quid I purchased 10m of the stuff and for reference purposes the one in the piccy is 3mm thick by 3.5cm wide. 

There are a variety of different sizes available and I'm pretty sure it can be jazzed up with a bit of flock on the edges etc. Certainly a cheap way of doing roads.

Having taken some off the roll I was disappointed to see that it kept wanting to curl. This could have been solved by gluing it to a base board of course but since I didn't want the depth of the road to be any thicker I pressed it flat and put a bit of sellotape on the back. It's remained flat for a week now so I think I might have solved the problem.

Anywhoo I'm offski. My Peter Pig Vikings arrived yesterday and they aren't going to base coat themselves. 

TTFN


19 comments:

  1. I can barely see the join! Nice work.

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    1. Cheers Jonathan. Hope that legs getting better!

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    2. Leg is getting better. Can actually put some weight on it now.

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  2. The river bend is a job well done, I have seen / held the product and so have some idea of the care that was taken to do this.

    I am coming to the conclusion that 30 - 35mm is the ideal road width for the smaller scales. I recently had some cork strips from a model rail shop for track and that had a very accurate chamfer along the edge. I was really surprised because I didn’t think the ‘bitty’ nature of cork would allow such a smooth cut, I can only assume a very sharp blade is needed, or perhaps they are cut under some sort of press - either way, they looked very good.

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    1. Hey Norm, all my units are based on 3cm bases so it’s worked out fine like this. Know what you mean about the cork. Strange the way they’ve managed to get it so smooth.

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  3. An excellent outcome on the river bend and nice reuse of the cork under track.

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  4. All good stuff. I spent some time last night wondering about how you will do curves for the roads?

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    1. Bonsoir Monsieur, I suspect it'll be yet more chocolate orange segment / slices!

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  5. You can barely see the join! Arsenal! Actually works really well, nice work and the road is good too!
    Best Iain

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    1. Arsenal...LOL Classic. Ant n Dec eat your heart out!

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  6. That’s turned out rather well... ;-)

    Could you use an iron to flatten out the cork strip...?

    All the best. Aly

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    1. Your probably onto something there Aly, but I’m frightened to go near the damned iron in case I get dragooned into using it for real!

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  7. Those river sections are excellent JBM, I certainly can't see the join! I'll be grabbing some of that for my 6mm project. For road section I decided to save myself a lot of work by purchasing the product below from S&A scenics. It's better than it looks in the photos and is also flexible, for £13.50 you get 10' of assorted road sections and can tart it up a bit by adding a touch of static grass along the edges, although I just use as it is. Your cork roll will work well too :)

    https://scenics.co.uk/#!/Roads/c/3184355/offset=0&sort=normal

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    1. Cheers for the link Lee, their roads look ace. Unfortunately one of the issues with fighting on a hexed mat is ensuring that the roads and rivers bend within the confines of the hexes. If I could have been sure that the bends would enter and exit a hex correctly I would have bought these over the cork any day.

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    2. JBM, of course, I had forgotten you were using hexes for a moment there! When I was making my old hex grid table for the 6mm Napoleonics I asked Tony Barr to cut me some road and river sections that fitted the hexes, took him a little while to work it out but he did manage to do it for me. Worth keeping S&A Scenics in mind, Simon does some lovely small trees for 6mm and other useful bits.

      All the best mate, seen any sun there yet? Not much here, 25 degrees back in Valencia last week!

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    3. Hey Lee, I'll keep S &A in mind they do make some nice stuff.

      Sun? What the hell's sun? We only do rain and high winds over on the west side mate. The river Teifi that runs through our village rose 15ft in a day and submerged the bridge at nearby LLechryd! Scary stuff.

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  8. Nice looking rivers and Roads there JBM. I made my own but it is time consuming and uses a fair chunk of milliput, On the plus side I can have any curves I want.

    Oh and my personal fave is that nice Mr Preview being told ...'I'm playing all the Right Notes, just not necessarily in the right order!'

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    1. Hi Elenderil, I suspect you might have been behind the great Milliput famine of '09…lol. Yeah I remember that Andre Previn sketch, and the Angela Rippon one. Classic comedy from a golden age.

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